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COALMONTHISTORYTHE BEGINNINGUPPER TOWNCOAL AND RAILBOOM TOWNSTILL BOOMINGCOMMUNITYTIME LINELibraryGranite CreekCOALMONT BOOKStory of SimilkameenThe Tulameen TrailMOZEY-ON-INNCopyrighte-mail me

Still Booming


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Main Street of Coalmont during the boom times.  In the foreground, the Coalmont Hotel (which has operated nearly continuously ever since), next was the Royal Bank, beside that the Canadian Legion (which was formerly a Store), and in the distance was likely Doctor Sheffield's house.  Note the raised boardwalks and dirt roads.  Photo ca.1930s from the Provincial Archives of B.C.


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Rear view of the Coalmont Hotel and the Royal Bank in 1933, with Dave Brown in his pedal car.  Photo courtesy Dave Brown.


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Foxcrowle P. Cook's store was one of the first buildings in Coalmont ca.1911.  It was right across the street from the location of the Mozey-On-Inn today.  Photo courtesy Dave Brown.


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F.P Cook funded the Coalmont Courier newspaper, which was located on his property.  It was only published for 6 months in 1912, and heralded Coalmont as the "City of Destiny" with a population soon to be 10,000.  It never even came close.  Photo courtesy Dave Brown.


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Isaac McTavish opened his General Store in 1912, and it operated continuously under several owners until 1971 when the business moved across the street to the Coalmont Emporium.  Photo ca.1932 courtesy Dave Brown.


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The Coalmont General Store still survives today, but only as a private residence.  It is located on the left side of Parrish Ave. as you enter from Princeton.  2004 photo by Bob Sterne.


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There were actually two Livery Stables in Coalmont in 1911, but only one still survived in 2005.  It is located on Front Street, East of the General Store.  The other Livery Stable was a block West, and vanished long ago.  Bob Sterne photo.


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This photo shows the first car over the Coalmont to Princeton Road.  At the summit, there was once a sign posted that read "Princeton to Coalmont 12 miles.  This is the most DAMNABLE ROAD IN B.C.  292 curves - count 'em".  Photo by Ed Lucas, courtesy the Princeton Museum.


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After the mine closed, this Sawmill was in operation past the east end of Main Street.  Photo ca.1945 from the Provincial Archives of B.C.

 

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